The flavors of Andalusia

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Photo by Eloy Muñoz Photography

Semana Santa flavors

 

Semana Santa , or Holy Week in Spain, is not only about religious ecstasy, processions, tears of emotion and the roar of drums. It is also another good opportunity to meet family and friends. Therefore, do not be surprised that immediately after the shouts of admiration at the sight of passing thrones, the crowd disperses and goes to nearby pubs for beer or tapas (such as Las Merchanas Restaurant ) to rest, gossip and continue following the next processions.

 

While in Poland it is the time of the proverbial egg, sour rye soup or various meat products, in Spain torrijas are eaten, which can be found in nearby confectioneries only during the Semana Santa period. What is this? Nothing else but a slice of bread dipped in milk with lemon and cinnamon, dipped in an egg and fried until golden brown. This seemingly modest dessert is very caloric and may not look very chic, but it is adored by the Spaniards, especially by children. There are many versions of torrijas: with honey, sugar, caramel or milk torrijas.

 

The tradition of eating torrijas dates back to the 15th century, and its Lenten character is associated with the exclusion of meat consumption during Holy Week. Therefore, bread became the perfect remedy for hunger, and the calorific value of the dessert made it possible to stay strong during many hours of processions. It was also the perfect way to use stale bread and to use simple and always available ingredients like honey and eggs. Torrijas are usually a filling breakfast or a dessert consumed throughout the day, served hot or cold, and tastes best up to 3 days after preparation.

 

The recipe, which dates back to the times of the Roman Empire, is exceptionally simple:

Ingredients:

  • 6 slices of stale bread

  • 1.5 cups of milk

  • 2 eggs

  • 2 tablespoons of sugar

  • Olive oil for frying

  • Sugar mixed with cinnamon to sprinkle on the finished torrijas

Execution:

  • Dip the bread in milk mixed with 2 tablespoons of sugar, and then in beaten egg.

  • Fry in hot olive oil on each side until golden brown.

  • Take the ready-made torrijas off the pan and put them on a paper napkin for a while so that the excess oil is absorbed.

 

As with every holiday in Malaga, suddenly everything around takes on characteristic symbols. That is why in confectioneries, apart from torrijas, we can also find all sweets that look like nazarenos, that is penitents straight from the Ku-Klux-Klan :) Enjoy your meal!